The deep link between great art, the land of St. Francis and history

There is a deep and intense connection between Umbra, the land where Bottega Tifernate is born and lives, and the biggest of all times. A bond that is nourished by the landscapes, the beauty, the quiet and the good temperament and humanity of these people. This territory gave birth to and fascinated great artists and painters.


This red thread became perceptible again during the pandemic, when the whole world, connected to hear the words of Pope Francis, admired the big Pala della Resurrezione (2.33 meters by 1.65 meters high) behind it. (alta 2,33 metri per 1,65). A work that has the strange privilege of being visible and invisible: placed in the Library deprived of the Holy Father, it witnesses great meetings between the Popes and the most significant personalities of the history. It was built by Pietro Vannucci known as “IL Perugino,” and thus links this land to the major events of 2020. It was commissioned by Bernardino di Giovanni da Orvieto, a member of an important Umbrian family. It was placed on the altar of the family in “San Francesco al Prato” church in Perugia, in 1499. Probably built by 1501, with the Napoleonic thefts, it ended in Paris in 1797. After it, was then brought back to Italy in 1815 and destined for Rome, in the Vatican. A few years later, Raphael, who had already become even greater than the master, created a kind of “Pantheon of Perugia,” two of the most important altarpieces, the Deposizione Baglioni andl’Incoronazione, for two prestigious family.
The images of Perugino’s work in world vision a few days after the 500th anniversary of the death of Raphael “Prince” of the Italian Renaissance, brings out the red thread that links this small region to the greatest Masters of Italian art; a connection that becomes again in these difficult days, visible, strong and beautiful.

THE RAPHAEL'S YEAR

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